Serendipity Experimental Printmaking Workshop

8 10 2010

Check out the blog that Lasanaa started to document our recent Serendipity Experimental Printmaking Workshop. The workshop ended yesterday (just in time for the big Dashain holiday) and was a GREAT success. I truly enjoyed it and I think the students did, too. In fact, I know they did because it showed in their excitement level and the work they produced. Tomorrow we’ll be documenting their artwork in order to produce a small catalog and selecting exhibition-quality prints. One set of prints will be displayed in Kathmandu’s Srijana Art Gallery after the Tihar holiday in November, one set will stay with Lasanaa for future fundraising purposes and I’ll take one set home to Iowa to share in some capacity with Cedar Rapidians and the MMU community. Images of student artwork coming soon! Enjoy!

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13 responses

11 10 2010
Rob S

The print artwork seems interesting. I was wondering if you could explain the content or give some examples maybe of the styles of expressions coming from the workshop. Is there some artworks that have a greater abundence of meaning and value within them?

11 10 2010
Kathryn Hagy

Hi Rob,

As soon as we photograph the artwork and get it up on the other blog, we’ll also post written statements from the students describing the content of their work. Then, you can decide for yourself. I personally try not to use the word “style” except when necessary to describe historical work where the art can more readily be categorized (and even that is problematic). I would hate for younger, emerging artists to think that they must work in a certain “style” because that invites pre-categorization even before the creative process has begun. So no, I don’t see a certain “style” in the students’ prints. We tried to get them to focus their ideas on something meaningful and personally significant to them so that the resulting artwork would contain their focus and passion. When students choose random ideas that don’t relate to their lives in some way, the work can seem unfocused and superficial. That did happen to some extent in this workshop, as it does in many classes (including MMU). However, the great majority of these Nepali students continued to push their artwork further by creating additional prints even if their first prints weren’t so hot. I don’t want to single anyone out on a public blog.

9 10 2010
Amanda Walker

Kathryn,
I looked at the pictures of the printmaking workshop, and the students look like they are having such a great time! What type of printmaking did they like the best? I have never done any kind of printmaking, and I think that it would be really challenging to do, but also fun.
Amanda Walker

11 10 2010
Kathryn Hagy

Hi Amanda,

We by no means covered all the printmaking methods (not even close) but we covered enough that each student was able to find something they enjoyed. I tried to show some techniques they could do cheaply at home, because access to equipment and materials are always a challenge in printmaking, but especially for these students. Maybe you can take a printmaking class at MMU? I teach one every spring (and sometimes during J-term). Check it out in the catalog: AR151 Beginning Printmaking.

9 10 2010
Anna

The workshop sounds great. You said that you could see that they enjoyed the workshop in their excitement and in the work they produced, do you think that motivation is a very significant factor when making art? Do you think that people with “low” art skills can become good artists if they have the motivation and the desire to create art?

11 10 2010
Kathryn Hagy

I think motivation is one of the MOST important factors in making art. Self-motivation is best, of course, but motivation can come from outside as well. I do think people with “low” art skills with motivation and desire can create good art, because I’ve seen it happen. To have it happen consistently, to be able to network, talk about and share your art with others and have the talent to also market yourself is maybe where I’d separate the amateur from the professional. Some people can do all of the former without training (i.e. art education) but what education does provide is a ready group of peers, which is harder to duplicate on your own.

8 10 2010
yer sister

I can’t wait to see the students’ artwork.

BTW, between the apron and the side parted hair you’ve got a nice 50s look going.

11 10 2010
Kathryn Hagy

Yes, I was cultivating that look with my Mexican ma’am apron!

18 10 2010
yer sister

It works for you.

8 10 2010
Ryan Kennebeck

I was glad to see that the printmaking was a success. You mentioned a holiday do you know what this holiday is about?

11 10 2010
Kathryn Hagy

More on the Dashain holiday later! We’re in the midst of it now and I want to get the Indra Jatra video posted before I start talking about Dashain and confusing everyone.

12 10 2010
Ryan Kennebeck

Hi,

I was wondering if you can if you can tell me a little bit about the culture of Nepal?

13 10 2010
Kathryn Hagy

Hi Ryan,

That’s a tall order! Is there a particular aspect of the culture you’re interested in knowing more about? I think you’ll find snippets of info throughout my blog, so let me know if there was something that piqued your interest.

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